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Dandelion

Dandelion

Name: Taxacum officinale

Origin: Albania

Aroma: Herbal

Flavor: Slightly bitter

Our Products: Leaf

Contact PGI for micro reduction, roasting, blending, milling, and social involvement with growers.

History

Dandelions, or dente de lion (lions tooth), have been apart of human herbalism for many centuries. It is believed that the herb originates on the Eurasian continent with some of the first usages recorded in China, ancient Rome and the medicinal gardens of the Anglo Saxons and Normans of France. Between the 10th and 11th centuries, Arabian physicians had written records of its healing properties. This plant was highly prized by Europeans and is thought to have been brought over to the New World by Puritan settlers. Though many now consider dandelion to be a weed, it’s usages as medicine and as a food staple have been long documented and it’s presence welcomed in many herbalists gardens. In the lore of the Minotaur of Crete, it is said that Hecate feeds Theseus dandelions for thirty days so that he has enough strength to kill the Minotaur. Dandelions varied uses can also  be seen during the rubber crisis in WWII when countries on both sides were experimenting with the roots of a specific dandelion species,  Taraxacum kok-saghyz which is composed of 10%-15% natural rubber.



Chamomile Tea

- Place 2 tsp of dried leaves in a tea infuser
- Bring 8 oz of filtered water to a boil
- Pour over leaves, steep for 5-10 min

Dandelion leaf can be bitter on its own. If you’d like a touch of sweetness add 1 tsp of honey after the leaves have been steeped.
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Traditional Uses

  Many cultures including the Chinese, Roman, Arab, Mexican European, and Native American have used dandelion for a variety of treatments and culinary delights. Some include tea for heartburn or  calming nerves, to heal liver ailments, treat diabetes, and in some cases ground into a paste to heal wounds faster. Modernly, dandelions best understood medicinal quality is as a diuretic and the leaves are attributed to being very high in potassium, vitamin A, and vitamin C content.

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Cinnamon

Cinnamon

Name: Cinnamomum burmannii

Origin: Indonesia, Vietnam

Aroma: Spicy, Earthy

Flavor: Spicy, Woody, Sweet

Our Products: Cut & Sift, Tea Cut, Powder, Sticks

Contact PGI for micro reduction, roasting, blending, milling, and social involvement with growers.

History

The use of the fragrant bark known as Cinnamon has been documented since 2,000 BC. Some of these early uses are attributed to the ancient Egyptians who used cinnamon in the embalming process not only for its spicy-sweet scent but also for its preservation proprieties. At first, this exotic bark was only available to the elite and Pliny the Elder, a Roman philosopher and naturalist, wrote about cinnamon as being 15x the value of silver. The price was driven up and controlled by those who possessed access to the farms in Ceylon, modern-day Sri Lanka. To justify the extreme costs, traders would tell lavish stories that told of the extreme lengths taken to harvest this spice. One such story, written about by a Greek historian, tells of giant mountain birds that made their nests where no man could reach and would carry cinnamon sticks up to their nests. In order to access these stockpiles of cinnamon, a person would leave large segments of ox meat for the bird and when it returned to its nest, the weight of the meat would knock the nests to the ground. These tales added to the allure of buying cinnamon for such exorbitant rates. Because this was a highly sought after and profitable spice, European countries began to seek ways to gain access to Ceylon in hopes to control the trade. Eventually, the Portuguese in 1518 found the kingdom of Kotto, an island of Ceylon, and gained control of the cinnamon trade through terrible means. After came the Dutch who took power from the Portuguese and then followed the British. By the 1800 cinnamon trees were being cultivated in multiple countries and the demand dropped as it became so widely available.



Cozy Spiced Milk

- 1.5 cups of Macadamia Milk
- 1 stick of Cinnamon (or 1 tsp of powder)
- 1 tsp local raw honey

Add milk and cinnamon to a small saucepan and simmer until small bubbles form around the edge of the pan, don’t allow the mixture to boil. Strain over your favorite mug, add honey and enjoy! If you use powder, whisk the mixture as its simmering or use a milk frother or immersion blender to fully incorporate the cinnamon into the milk. 

Traditional Uses

Once cinnamon spread across the ancient world, many cultures adopted it for varied uses. In Roman culture, cinnamon was used to flavor wine, perfumes, and if you could afford it you would burn it with a funeral pyre. For Asian, Mexican, Arabic and North African cultures it was heavily prized as a culinary spice. Cinnamon was also used as medicine to aid in digestion, leveling blood sugar, as an anticoagulant, to ease menstrual pains, as a mild painkiller, and to prevent bacterial growths. It is also thought to have aesthetic qualities in Chinese culture, with the belief that cinnamon will lead to a younger and more youthful complexion.

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Lavender

Lavender

Name: Lavandula angustifolia

Origin: Albania, Germany

Aroma: Floral

Flavor: Floral

Our Products: Leaf, Powder

Contact PGI for micro reduction, roasting, blending, milling, and social involvement with growers.

History

      Documentation regarding lavender has existed for 2,500 years, but its use in human culture can be traced all the way back to ancient Egypt. When King Tutankhamen’s tomb was opened in 1922 excavators found lavender that was still faintly fragrant. This beautiful purple flower was also popular in many cultures in the ancient world and was mostly used as a perfume and then as a medicine. For it’s believed antiseptic properties the plant was also dried and burnt within sick rooms to cleanse the space. Popular in England, it was documented that Queen Elizabeth loved lavender and often consumed it in tea to treat migraines. By the middle ages this herb was considered to represent love and was used as an aphrodisiac. During the great plague Four Thieves Vinegar, lavender being one of it’s ingredients, was produced to keep from catching the grave illness. In the 14 and 1500’s it was thought that if young ladies sipped on lavender on St. Luke’s Day, they would dream of their true love whereas lavender found under a young man’s pillow is said to encourage them to get engaged.



Minty Lavender Tea

- ¼ cup lavender petals
- 1 cup fresh mint leaves
- 2 cups filtered water

 Place all ingredients into a saucepan and bring to a boil. Turn to a low heat and simmer for 15-20 minutes. Strain and pour into your favorite mug. For summertime, double the herbs and let the mixture cool then serve over ice! 

Traditional Uses

Lavender is one of many medicinal plants that possess a plethora of medicinal uses noted across cultures. In times of war lavender was used to cleanse wounds by ingesting it as well as applying a poultice over the area. A popular medicine was that of red lavender tincture. This was made from a mixture of herbs that would steep in wine for seven days. This was used for a variety of treatments including the belief that it would help palsy. Lavender was also used to keep moths out of linens and to add scent into a warm bath and common rooms.

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Chamomile

Chamomile

Name: Matricaria recutita

Origin: Egypt

Aroma: Herbal

Flavor: Slightly bitter, sweet, aromatic

Our Products: Whole flower, tea cut, pollen, powder

Contact PGI for micro reduction, roasting, blending, milling, and social involvement with growers.

History

Chamomile has a long history of use that dates back to the ancient Egyptians, Greeks, and Romans. A large variety of medicinal treatments called for this herb with the first written account attributed to the Egyptians as a cure for ague or a fever. Chamomile was associated with their sun god Ra and used in the process of mummification to repel insects as well as mask scent. The name Chamomile originates from the Greek word khamaimēlon meaning “earth-apple”. Though this plant was mainly medicinal, its use was also to add a sweet aroma to a room, bath, or applied directly to the skin as a perfume. It’s been noted in folklore that the Vikings also used chamomile to lighten their hair and add sheen to it, which is still a common use today.



Chamomile Tea

- Place 2 Tbsp of chamomile in a tea infuser
- Bring 4 oz of filtered water to a boil
-Pour over flowers and steep for 5 min

Chamomile pairs well with many other ingredients try adding ginger, mint, or honey to your tea before steeping to experience new aromas and flavors!!

Traditional Uses

Cultures around the world and throughout time have used chamomile for a variety of uses. Some of the most common include treatments for anxiety, stress reduction, insomnia, inflammation, flu, anti-bacterial applications, sore-throat, and much more. In folklore, this plant is said to attract money to you if placed in your wallet and promises good luck for gambling by washing your hands in water that has been steeped with chamomile. If you are to wear chamomile in your hair it will a attract a lover and to carry it in your pocket will bring you good luck.